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Monthly Archives: April 2016
Complementary Colours - Easy Peasy Art School

Complementary Colours


Tips for the Easy Peasy Artist

Colour Knowledge by Easy Peasy Art School

Artists need to know their colours. If you would like to be an artist you need to know all about how colours are made by mixing colours together. You also need to know how colours work together and how you can use colours to grab the viewers attention or even help tell your story.

Colours are often displayed on a COLOUR WHEEL to show how they are related.

This colour wheel shows COMPLEMENTARY COLOURS. Complementary colours are pairs of colours that are opposite one another on the colour wheel. Another name for complimentary colours is OPPOSITE  COLOURS.

There are many, many pairs of complementary colours but this colour wheel shows the most commonly known pairs.

What's all the fuss about?

Artists often use complementary colours to grab the viewers attention. Our eyes love to see complementary colours together in an artwork. Vincent vanGogh was famous for his use of complementary colours. He would often team up complementary colours in his brushstrokes and his paintings to make them visually appealing. He loved to use purples and yellows or red and greens together to name but a few.

In your own artworks, you can use complementary colours together to do the same. In your next artwork, try placing a set of complementary colours next to one another. Watch as your artwork leaps from the page because of how you have used your new found knowledge on complementary colours.

Complementary Colours:

In Art, common pairs of  COMPLEMENTARY COLOURS are :

RED & GREEN

BLUE & ORANGE

YELLOW & VIOLET

RED ORANGE & BLUE GREEN

RED VIOLET & YELLOW GREEN

BLUE VIOLET & YELLOW ORANGE

More Information:

To further your colour knowledge, don’t forget to read our other blogs on primary, secondary and tertiary colours. If you would like a print out of our colour wheel posters, have a look on our website under LESSONS > OTHER > COLOUR WHEELS. Here you will find printable colour wheels available in both English and U.S spelling.

Complementary Colour Wheel - Easy Peasy Art School

 

Macro Flower - Easy Peasy Art School

Macro Flower – Easy Peasy Art School

Try other combinations of complementary colours. For example, yellow and purple.

Try other combinations of complementary colours. For example, yellow and purple.

Tertiary Colours - Easy Peasy Art School

Tertiary Colours


Tips for the Easy Peasy Artist

Colour Knowledge by Easy Peasy Art School

Artists need to know their colours. If you would like to be an artist you need to know all about how colours are made by mixing colours together.

Colours are often displayed on a COLOUR WHEEL to show how they are related.

TERTIARY colours are the next set of colours after our  SECONDARY colours. Tertiary colours are created when we mix a PRIMARY colour with an adjacent SECONDARY colour on the colour wheel.

The 6 TERTIARY Colours:

In Art, the six TERTIARY COLOURS are :

RED ORANGE

RED VIOLET 

BLUE VIOLET

BLUE GREEN

YELLOW GREEN

YELLOW ORANGE

How are they made?

  • Red Orange: Red Orange Red & Orange
  • Red Violet: Red Violet = Red & Violet
  • Blue Violet: Blue Violet = Blue & Violet
  • Blue Green: Blue Green = Blue & Green
  • Yellow Green: Yellow Green = Yellow & Green
  • Yellow Orange: Yellow Orange = Yellow & Orange

Don't Forget!

When we say or write a TERTIARY colour’s name, we always say or write the PRIMARY colour first. For example we always use the name RED-ORANGE, not Orange Red.

But what about PURPLE?

Sometimes people call the Secondary colour made by mixing RED & BLUE as PURPLE. The colour Purple is actually what is called a tertiary colour (A colour created by mixing a primary with a secondary colour.) Another name for purple is BLUE-VIOLET. As well as PURPLE this colour is also sometimes know as INDIGO.

More Information:

To further your colour knowledge, don’t forget to read our other blogs on primary, tertiary and complementary colours. If you would like a print out of our colour wheel posters, have a look on our website under LESSONS > OTHER > COLOUR WHEELS. Here you will find printable colour wheels available in both English and U.S spelling.

Tertiary Colours - Easy Peasy Art School

 

Tertiary Colours - Easy Peasy Art School

Secondary Colours - Easy Peasy Art School

Secondary Colours


Tips for the Easy Peasy Artist

Colour Knowledge by Easy Peasy Art School

Artists need to know their colours. If you would like to be an artist you need to know all about how colours are made by mixing colours together.

Colours are often displayed on a COLOUR WHEEL to show how they are related.

Secondary colours are the next set of colours after our PRIMARY colours. SECONDARY colours are created when we mix equal parts of 2 Primary Colours.

The 3 Secondary Colours:

In Art, the three SECONDARY COLOURS are :

ORANGE 

GREEN

VIOLET

How are they made?

  • Orange: Orange = Red & Yellow
  • Green: Green = Yellow & Blue
  • Violet: Violet = Blue & Red

But what about PURPLE?

Sometimes people call the Secondary colour made by mixing RED & BLUE as PURPLE. The colour Purple is actually what is called a tertiary colour (A colour created by mixing a primary with a secondary colour.) Another name for purple is BLUE-VIOLET.

More Information:

To further your colour knowledge, don’t forget to read our other blogs on primary, tertiary and complementary colours. If you would like a print out of our colour wheel posters, have a look on our website under LESSONS > OTHER > COLOUR WHEELS. Here you will find printable colour wheels available in both English and U.S spelling.

Secondary Colours - Easy Peasy Art School

 

Blog secondary colours - Easy Peasy Art School

Art Knowledge - Easy Peasy Art School

Art Knowledge At Easy Peasy Art School


What Can I Learn at Easy Peasy Art School?

At Easy Peasy Art School, we believe that it’s important to learn not only the skills but also the knowledge of how to create artworks.

In the “Lessons” section of our school you will find all of the great ideas and steps for you to create your artworks. The “Art Knowledge” section is for both teachers and students at Easy Peasy Art School. Here you will find all of the information you are looking for about different mediums, techniques and information on becoming an artist. For teachers, here you will also find the tips and tricks on improving your teaching of art and making the most of your art lessons.

Our Art Knowledge blog is updated on a regular basis and features two main categories:

Easy Peasy Art School Knowledge Base:

Tips for the Easy Peasy Artist.

&

Easy Peasy Art School Classroom:

Tips for the Visual Arts Teacher

Easy Peasy Art School Knowledge Base: Tips for the Easy Peasy Artist.

To help find what you are looking for, just look for the hexagon logo. These are the blog posts for students.

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Easy Peasy Art School Classroom: Tips for the Visual Arts Teacher

To help find what you are looking for, just look for the circle logo. These are the blog posts for teachers.

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Easy Peasy Art School Classroom

 

Easy Peasy Art School Knowledge Base

 

 

How to use oil pastels - easy peasy art school

How To Use Oil Pastels


Tips for the Easy Peasy Artist

Tips & tricks on how to use those funny feeling, smudgy ‘crayons’.

Oil Pastels Are NOT Crayons:

The first thing to remember is that oil pastels are not crayons. They are very different in what they are made of and how they are used. Oil pastels use oil and wax to hold them together. This creates the soft, creamy texture of an oil pastel and enables them to be coloured and blended. Crayons use wax to hold them together which makes them much harder and a little more difficult to use.

Tips on setting up:

  • Use sheets of newspaper or a table cover to protect your desk.
  • Also use the newspaper to ‘clean’ the oil pastels. Oil pastels can sometimes become smudged with other colours.
  • Spray finished works with fixative or hairspray to prevent smudging.
  • Try using vegetable dye or a paint wash over the top of an oil pastel artwork to complete the background. It is quicker and uses less oil pastel. It’s also great to use to fill in the spaces.

What Skills and Knowledge Do You Need?:

You need to practise these skills if you are going to be great at using oil pastels.

How to hold an oil pastel:

One of the downsides of oil pastels is that they can be smudged very easily, especially if you hold them like a pencil.

To stop smudging your work practise these skills:

  • Hold the oil pastel like a knife which you are using to cut up your food.
  • Hold the oil pastel like you would a key when unlocking a door.
  • Or simply, place your thumb on one side and the remainder of your fingers on the other side.

Know your colours:

You need to know which oil pastel colours can be blended together.

Colours that can be blended together are colours that are nearby on the colour wheel. Colours that are opposite each other or a long way apart on the colour wheel are very difficult to blend and make look nice.

Examples of colours that can be blended:

  • Dark Blue, Light Blue, White
  • Purple, Dark Blue, Light Blue
  • Dark Green, Light Green, Yellow
  • Red, Orange, Yellow
  • Brown, Red, Orange
  • Brown, Orange, Flesh Tone
  • Brown, Flesh tone

Learn how to colour with oil pastels:

We don’t actually ‘colour in’ with oil pastel. By colouring, as you would with pencils or crayons, your work would be scratchy with lots of spaces. When colouring with oil pastels, the best way would be to think of it as ‘squashing the oil pastel onto the page’.

Some things to remember:

  • Press firmly. Make sure that the correct grip is used to prevent smudging.
  • Use short strokes, overlapping as you go so as to avoid white spaces.
  • If you use long, fast strokes you introduce lots of empty white spaces in your colouring.
  • Avoid using black until last as it is more obvious when smudged.
  • If your oil pastels are dirty with other colours, clean them first on newspaper or a piece of scrap paper.

Blending:

One of the best things about oil pastels is how we can blend them which means mixing colours together.

Some things to remember:

  •  Choose colours from the same family, colours that are close together on the colour wheel.
  •  Always start with the darker colour.
  •  Using short firm strokes, press firmly to begin with but as you move away gradually press lighter and lighter until your colouring becomes a little messy or scratchy or shaded. We do this so we don’t have a line between two colours when we blend them.
  • Using the lighter colour, colour over the ‘messy’ colouring by overlapping. ALWAYS BLEND WITH THE LIGHTER COLOUR. This seems to work better than using the darker of the two.
  •  These steps can be repeated using more colours if you like.
  • White can be added at the end as a highlight. Simply blend over the top of a light area using white oil pastel.
  • Black can also be used when finished to create shadow. Shade in the desired area with black and then blend it back in with the original colour.

Outlining:

The final skill you need to know before you can become an oil pastel expert is outlining. A simple black outline can turn your artwork into something dramatic and eye-catching. It adds contrast and emphasises the vibrant colour of the oil pastels.

Some things to remember:

  • Black seems to work best when outlining.
  • Always leave outlining until last as the black will stand out when smudged and may wreck your work.
  • Practise drawing lines on scrap first. See if you can draw lines of various thicknesses.
  • Aim to outline using a single dark line rather than colouring the outline. This can sometime make an ugly, thick, messy line.
  • When outlining, press ‘really hard’.
  • Turn the oil pastel every so often to stop the line from getting thicker.

Expert Techniques:

If you master the basics and find that you are looking for new ways to use your oil pastels you could always try some of these other techniques.

Sgraffito: 

Sgraffito means to scratch back layers. In an oil pastel artwork this means that you can use a sharp object to scratch back layers of colour to reveal other colours underneath. You can also use sgraffito to scratch in details such as lines, patterns or textures or highlights.

Objects to use for sgraffito include:

  • Bamboo food skewers – (please be careful with safety here!)
  • Toothpicks
  • Paddle Pop sticks.

Rubbing back:

Use a soft eraser to rub out areas of coloured oil pastel to create highlights in your artwork.

Painting over with oil:

An interesting technique to try is to once an oil pastel artwork has been coloured, paint over it using vegetable or baby oil. This dissolves the oil pastel and turns it into a painting. Just reminder that it amy take a while to dry so you will need an area for drying.

Now that you are an expert with oil pastels, get creating and have fun with this amazing medium!

Would you like to know more?:

Check out our lesson “How to use oil pastels” for step by step instructions on how to use oil pastels.

Click on the photo to find out more!

oilpastelsthumb

How to use oil pastels - easy peasy art school

oilpastels1 oilpastels2 oilpastels3

The Amazing Oil Pastel - Easy Peasy Art School

The Amazing Oil Pastel


All you need to know about those funny feeling, smudgy ‘crayons’.

I love oil pastels. They are so easy to use and produce brilliant results. They are an ever popular and cost effective medium for primary and elementary schools. Yet I would argue that most teachers don’t know how to use them to their fullest potential or even worse, to my horror, refer to them as crayons!

Introduction:

I am sure most of you would have seen and probably even used oil pastels in your classroom before. Most of you might know oil pastels as those greasy feeling “crayons” that smudge easily and tend to make a mess of the students’ work. However, the oil pastel if used correctly, can prove to be a fantastic medium in which students can produce vibrant art without the preparation, mess and cleanup of paint.

Oil Pastels Are NOT Crayons:

The first thing to remember is that oil pastels are not crayons. They are very different in what they are made of and how they are used. Oil pastels use a binder made of oil and wax to hold them together. This creates the soft, creamy texture of an oil pastel and enables them to be coloured and blended on different surfaces. Whereas crayons use wax alone as their binder which makes them much harder and a little more difficult to use.

Crayons have their place in a classroom, they too are a wonderful medium, but make sure you know the difference so that you can make an educated choice when it comes to choosing a medium for your class’ art lesson.

Types of Oil Pastel:

There are many different types and brands of oil pastel available to purchase for use in your classroom. They are available from most educational suppliers or art supply stores and can differ dramatically in price and quality ranging from cheap through to expensive artist quality. When purchasing oil pastels, you will need to remember a few things:

Sometimes the very cheap oil pastels are quite hard and prove to be difficult to use or blend. Make sure your oil pastels are soft enough that the students can blend and colour with relative ease.

Oil pastels can come in different sizes. For classroom use, oil pastels that are approx.10mm wide as a minimum are best. Oil pastels that are smaller than this tend to break and wear out very easily.

Using Oil Pastels In Your Classroom:

Here are some tips on making the most of your oil pastels in the classroom.

  • Use sheets of newspaper under students work to prevent marking tables and to ‘clean’ the oil pastels on. Oil pastels can sometimes become smudged with other colours.
  • Spray finished works with fixative or hairspray to prevent smudging.
  • With new boxes, try to use at least one box per two students so that hey have access to the colours they need.
  • As the boxes fall into disrepair and the oil pastels become mixed, sort them into colours and put into ice cream or other containers. This makes it easier to hand out the colours needed for an activity. Alternatively, place them mixed colours in large plastic trays or containers so that students can find colours easily.
  • If you intend on doing an artwork which requires students to colour the whole page, use a smaller piece of art or cartridge paper. This uses less oil pastel, enables the students to complete the activity quickly and prevents tired hands.
  • Try doing an oil pastel artwork as a group project on a large piece of cardboard or paper. It is great for developing cooperative group skills plus creates a dramatic and bold affect when displayed in your classroom.
  • Try using vegetable dye or a paint wash over the top of an oil pastel artwork to complete the background. It is quicker and uses less oil pastel. It’s also great to use to fill in the spaces created by younger students who have greater difficulty removing all of their white spaces on the page.

What Skills & Do Students Need?

Before students can master the art of using oil pastels correctly, they will need to develop the following skills and knowledge. You need to directly teach these skills. Students won’t simply just pick them up.

Grip:

Unfortunately one of the down sides of oil pastels, is the ease in which they can be smudged. To overcome this, students need to be taught the correct way to hold an oil pastel so that their hand or arm does not touch their work.

Some ideas to help explain the grip to students:

  • Hold the oil pastel like a knife which you are using to cut up your food.
  • Hold the oil pastel like you would a key when unlocking a door.
  • Or simply, place your thumb on one side and the remainder of your fingers on the other side.

Knowledge of Colours:

Before students can be taught how to blend, they need to be taught which colours can be blended together.

  • An easy way to do this is by using a box of oil pastels. Have a box open in front of the students. Discuss which colours look similar, which are darker and which are lighter. Choose a colour and ask students to see if they can find an oil pastel in the box which looks similar but is lighter or darker etc.
  • On the board or on a chart to be displayed in the room, list the colours that can be blended together. I like to describe these as “Families” of colours.

For example:

  • Dark Blue, Light Blue, White
  • Purple, Dark Blue, Light Blue
  • Dark Green, Light Green, Yellow
  • Red, Orange, Yellow
  • Brown, Red, Orange
  • Brown, Orange, Flesh Tone
  • Brown, Flesh tone

Colouring Technique:

Students should be taught that we don’t actually ‘colour in’ with oil pastel. By colouring, as you would with pencils or crayons, the result would be scratchy with lots of spaces. With oil pastels, rather than colouring, the correct technique would be closer to ‘squashing the oil pastel onto the page’.

Some ideas to help explain the colouring technique to students:

  • Press firmly ensuring that the correct grip is used to prevent smudging.
  • Use short strokes, overlapping as you go so as to avoid white spaces.
  • If you use long, fast strokes you introduce lots of empty white spaces in your colouring.
  • Avoid using black until last as it is more obvious when smudged.
  • Ensure that the oil pastels are free of other colours by cleaning them first on newspaper or a piece of scrap paper.

Shading:

As well as colouring, sometimes we shade with oil pastels. We use shading when simply drawing with an oil pastel to add shadow or depth to our artwork Or we can layer shading over an existing colour to either lighten or darken a colour. Shading is achieved by simply pressing much lighter than we would when we are colouring or by also using the side of a much smaller piece of an oil pastel.

Blending:

One of the best features of oil pastels and one that makes them different to crayons is how they are able to be blended. Before children can blend effectively they should be taught the correct technique. Initially begin with blending just two colours from the same family. But as the student’s expertise increases they can progress onto using many more colours.

Some ideas to use when teaching students how to blend:

  •  Choose two colours from the same family. One dark and one light.
  •  Always start with the dark colour. Outline the object or area to be coloured.
  •  Using short firm strokes, press firmly close to the edge but as you move into the centre of the area, gradually press lighter and lighter until your colouring becomes somewhat messy or scratchy or shaded. I actually encourage students to colour in messily at this stage. Avoid having a distinct line where the darker colour finishes as it will be obvious when blended and there will not be a smooth transition from dark to light.
  •  Using the lighter colour, colour over the ‘messy’ colouring by overlapping. ALWAYS BLEND WITH THE LIGHTER COLOUR. This seems to work better than using the darker of the two.
  •  These steps can be repeated using more colours if desired.
  • White can be added at the end as a highlight. Simply blend over the top of a light area using white oil pastel.
  • Black can also be used when finished to create shadow. Shade in the desired area with black and then blend it back in with the original colour.

Outlining:

  • The final skill that children should be taught before they can become oil pastel experts is outlining. A simple black outline can turn a rather drab and unimpressive artwork into something dramatic and eye-catching. It adds contrast and emphasises the vibrant colour of the oil pastels.
  • Black seems to work best when outlining.
  • Always leave outlining until last as the black will stand out when smudged and may wreck the student’s work.
  • Have the students practise drawing lines on scrap first. See if they can draw lines of various thicknesses.
  • Aim for students to outline using a single dark line rather than colouring the outline. This can sometime produce an unsightly thick, messy line.
  • When outlining, encourage students to press ‘really hard’ so that they achieve a solid, bold black line.
  • Show students how to turn the oil pastel frequently so that they are always using a sharp edge.
  • It is easier to achieve solid, bold lines if they are drawn by ‘pulling’ the oil pastel down the page  towards yourself. Demonstrate to the students how they can turn their page whilst outlining so that they are always pulling the line down the page.

Advanced Techniques:

If you master the basics and find that you are looking for new ways to use your oil pastels you could always try some of these more advanced techniques:

Sgraffito: 

Sgraffito means to scratch back layers. In an oil pastel artwork this means that you can use a sharp object to scratch back layers of colour to reveal other colours underneath. You can also use sgraffito to scratch in details such as lines, patterns or textures or highlights.

In the classroom, common implements to use for sgraffito include:

  • Bamboo food skewers – (please be careful with safety here!)
  • Toothpicks
  • Paddle Pop sticks.

Rubbing back:

Use a soft eraser to rub out areas of coloured oil pastel to create highlights in your artwork.

Painting over with oil:

An interesting technique to try is to once an oil pastel artwork has been coloured, paint over it using vegetable or baby oil. This dissolves the oil pastel and turns it into a painting. Just reminder that it amy take a while to dry so you will need an area for drying.

web-oilpastelblog

Using ink with your class - Easy Peasy Art School

Using Ink With Your Class


It’s not as terrifying as you think!

The idea of using ink in a primary or elementary classroom may conjure terrifying images in your mind of spillages, stained clothes, and smudged artworks. But with a little caution and a bit of preparation, ink can prove to be a wonderful art medium for your class to draw, paint or experiment with.

I’ve used ink for years in my teaching. From Year 6 all the way down to Kindergarten and even special education classes. All of my students have loved the experience of using ink to create artworks.

Benefits of using ink:

One of the benefits of using ink is its ability to help in the teaching of brush technique. You can paint much longer, thinner or thicker lines and all with one brush when using ink.

Ink can also be used beautifully when teaching students about value – light and dark in an artwork.

Students can mix ink with varying amounts of water or other colours to create lighter or darker shades in their work.

You can also use ink with different painting and drawing implements. You can paint with a brush, draw with a nib or stick and even blow ink with a straw to create different effects.

It’s ability to be used as both a drawing and painting medium can really help in adding more detail in a painting rather than when you use paint.

What type of Ink should I use?

Ink comes in different types but with younger children you should use water based drawing ink. It is easy to mix with water and easier to clean up.

You can get ink in many different colours but sometimes it’s great to use just one colour mixed with water or white ink to create monochromatic artworks.

What can I paint with?

Any type of brush works, but I like to use a soft bullet tipped brush. A size 6 works beautifully for both thin and thick lines.  You can also paint or draw with larger brushes and even wooden food skewers are great for adding thin scratchy lines.

Precautions:

Although ink can be amazing, you do need to take some precautions.

To prevent spills:

  • Place small amounts of ink in paint palettes or ice cube trays. Ink goes a long way, so you don’t need much. Ice cube trays or palettes are also great because the students can mix new colours.
  • Place small bottles of ink inside larger containers to prevent them form being knocked over.
  • Ensure your class is wearing paint shirts or aprons.
  • Table covers or newspaper are a necessity.
  • Ensure that students clean their hands and brushes throughly when competed.

Don’t be scared of ink. It’s well worth the precautions and a touch of pre-lesson anxiety!

web-inkblogs

 


 

The importance of looking at art with your class - Easy Peasy Art School

The Importance Of Looking At Art With Your Class


It’s just like cooking scrambled eggs!

I love food probably even more than I love art! So it is no wonder that I often use analogies or similes in my visual arts teaching that revolve around food. For example, I often use the terminology “ingredients of an artwork” or an artwork’s “recipe” when discussing or referring to the elements and principles of art. When teaching, we often  introduce concepts that our students struggle to understand and so explaining something in terms or by using a comparison they may understand can make the world of difference.

Scrambled Eggs:

The other day whilst teaching, I was showing a class a painting by Vincent  vanGogh and discussing his different way of using brushstrokes which was going to be the focus of the lesson. A rather impatient student in the class put up his hand to ask a question. He asked me why we had to look at the picture and when we were going to start painting our own. Rather than be upset or frustrated with the student, I saw this as an opportunity to impart some food-simile related wisdom.

I began by explaining to my class that I love to cook. I especially love to cook scrambled eggs. Every Sunday morning I get up, make some coffee and cook my scrambled eggs. I have always believed that my scrambled eggs are pretty damn good and I have always made them the same way. I would have probably continued to make my eggs the same way except for the fact that a few Sundays ago instead of cooking my eggs I went out to a cafe for breakfast, where guess what, I ordered scrambled eggs! When my order arrived and I began eating, I had to admit that these eggs were the best scrambled eggs that I had ever eaten. There’s not much that goes into scrambled eggs, so as I ate I decided I would work out what the chef had done differently to me to make them so great. I decided that what made the difference was the way that the chef had gently folded the eggs rather than scrambling them all up. It was also the small addition of some herbs and olive oil drizzled over the top.

Whilst making myself hungry reliving the story, I also then went on to explain that the following Sunday when it came time to cook breakfast, how I incorporated my new favourite eggs into the way I made mine.  Whilst my old eggs were great and It would have been ok to keep making them the same old way, it was also great that I got to see how someone else tried to cook the same thing. By looking at and experiencing the way that other people do things be it cooking or art we can learn new ways of doing things to improve the way that we do our own.

Encourage your students to look at art by other artists. By looking at the how – how artists have created their art and thinking about the why – why artists have done things in certain ways, we can improve on our own art making and make even more amazing ‘scrambled eggs!’

The importance of looking at art with your class - Easy Peasy Art School

Primary Colours - Easy Peasy Art School

Primary Colours


Colour knowledge by Easy Peasy Art School

Artists need to know their colours. If you would like to be an artist you need to know all about how colours are made by mixing colours together.

Colours are often displayed on a COLOUR WHEEL to show how they are related.

Primary colours are the building blocks of all colours. From these three colours, along with white and black, we can make just about all the colours we can think of by mixing them together in different amounts.

The 3 Primary Colours:

In Art, the three PRIMARY COLOURS are :

RED

BLUE 

YELLOW

A good way to remember why these colours are so special is that we can’t make these colours by mixing other colours together. No matter how hard I try, I can’t mix red, I can’t mix blue and I can’t mix yellow.

Black & White

BLACK & WHITE:

Black and white are special. Technically they aren’t even called colours. Black and white are used to make colours darker or lighter.

When we mix BLACK with a colour, that is called a SHADE

When we mix WHITE with a colour, that is called a TINT

When we mix both BLACK & WHITE (or GREY) with a colour, that is called a TONE

Are there other Primary Colours?

In art, we use what is called a Red, Blue, Yellow colour wheel. But in other areas different colours are used as primary colours. For example in science or on your computer, a Red, Green, Blue or a Cyan, Yellow, Magenta colour wheel may be used to describe how colours are created.

More Information:

To further your colour knowledge, don’t forget to read our other blogs on secondary, tertiary and complementary colours. If you would like a print out of our colour wheel posters, have a look on our website under LESSONS > OTHER > COLOUR WHEELS. Here you will find printable colour wheels available in both English and U.S spelling.

Primary Colours - Easy Peasy Art School

 

Primary Colour Wheel - Easy Peasy Art School

How Do I Teach Art To My Class?


Tips of experience on achieving great results from your art lessons.

As a teacher of visual arts education to future teachers, I’m often asked by them “How do you teach art to your class?” There is no easy answer to that question but rather a set of guiding principles which direct my teaching. So if I were to break it down into a list of must dos for those who would like to improve their teaching of the visual arts, here it is:

Your Mind Set:

Set high expectations for yourself and for your students of what they can achieve. They may be kids, but they can surprise you everyday with what is possible.

Learn to value that Visual Arts is not just about making a pretty picture for your classroom wall, it is a learning opportunity.

Planning:

Plan and program sequential activities that build on knowledge and skills.

Plan units of work that enable students to experience the various art forms and different subject matter and also that focus on developing an understanding of the ‘ingredients’ of a successful artwork.

Plan realistically based on the availability of materials and resources in the school.

Plan interesting and fun units of work that combine both making and appreciating.

Do the research! Learn about the materials and the artworks being discussed beforehand. Give yourself the background knowledge.

Organisation:

Be organised, set up and prepared for your lesson and organised for the pack up routine.

Anticipate what problems may arise in your lesson and put things in place to minimise the chance of it happening.

Have a try yourself beforehand. Don’t be afraid of what the students may think of your work.

Teaching:

Develop and practise your classroom management skills to ensure safety, to prevent mess or accidents and to maximise the success of your lesson.

Provide both direct teacher instruction and opportunities for students to freely create.

Break down activities step by step where needed and put directions into terms that the students can relate to or understand. (Use similes!)

Regularity:

Make or create on a weekly basis in varying art forms using a variety of materials. Don’t let your art lessons be swept away by a busy curriculum. Make time for it!

Appreciating and Discussing:

Develop students skills in appreciating their own artworks to learn from their successes and failures. Talk about their artwork with them.

Ensure that students appreciate the artwork of others and their classmates in a positive way. To learn from the successes and not so successes of their classmates.

Appreciate the artworks of artists; the features, the purpose, the history, the cultural significance , etc. Students find it rewarding and interesting and it provides both a starting point and a reference to the ‘Ingredients’ of artworks.

Feedback:

Provide positive, yet honest and constructive feedback to your students so that they can begin to critically reflect on their own work.

Celebrate student achievement through encouragement and the display of artworks.

By boosting self-esteem and confidence as an artist — “Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up.” Picasso

Assessment:

Recognise through ongoing assessment and student work samples, areas of need then modifying your teaching and planning accordingly.

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